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My  experience as a kidnap and rape victim at 18 years of age, though one of the darkest moments in my life, became the basis for my passion and interest in violent crimes. I came to a moment in time where I realized  the darkness would either consume me or I could make the conscious choice to rise up from the brokenness and use my experience to help others. 

 

That realization gave birth to my life's  work and left me with an unshakeable resolve to get to the truth. It also imparted to me a  deep understanding of the human spirit's ability to overcome even the most horrific of circumstances. I became  acutely aware of the truth that we are not defined by the tragedies and heartaches of life, but in how we choose to respond to them.  Darkness has no power over us save what we give to it. 

 

With every case I work I know full well that it could be my family searching for answers, I could be the missing person, the unidentified remains, with no name and no story. I was fortunate enough to survive that night and  I have dedicated my life to being the voice of those who can no longer speak for themselves.  It is an honor and a sacred responsibility to fight for these victims, to see to it that their stories are heard.

 

You can be  a part of finding answers for these unsolved cases. Read the stories and share the links because the more people these facts are presented to, the greater the likelihood they will be solved. They matter, they deserve answers, they deserve justice and you can make a difference in their story. Share their stories with your friends and family in person and on social media, which is a powerful networking tool.  They matter, their lives matter, their deaths matter, their stories matter.

~None forgotten, none silent,

VB

Update on Simpson County Jane Doe

I am so excited to be able to share a fascinating update with you on the Jane Doe cold case from Simpson County, Kentucky! Years ago I was able to ascertain that one of the rings found near her body (blue enamel with roses pictured below) was manufactured in the state of Rhode Island. I was also able to verify that manufacturing of that specific type of ring ended by the time Jane Doe would have been about 3 years old, using the approximate age of Jane Doe determined by forensic anthropologist, Dr. Emily Craig. New information which has been added to Jane Doe's profile on Namus.gov gives us the results of stable isotope analysis on this unidentified woman. Stable isotope analysis of bone and